Why Mowing Grass on Streambanks Is Bad

Grass Cut Short Can’t Grow Long Roots, and Long Roots Protect Against Erosion

Dec. 20, 2015

Short roots can’t hold the soil in place, let alone do their job of feeding soil microorganisms, creating a sponge to hold water, and pulling carbon from the air deep, deep into the soil where it can be sequestered.

This article from On Pasture magazine explains it all, with great photos of amazing grass roots. Though it’s written about grazing, the facts are true for mowing grass along our bayous and streams. Yes, even in parks.

Great “Grass Farmers” Grow Roots

By   /  November 9, 2015  /  5 Comments

– See more at: http://onpasture.com/2015/11/09/great-grass-farmers-grow-roots/#!prettyPhoto

Great “Grass Farmers” Grow Roots

Graphic from On Pasture magazine.

Graphic from On Pasture magazine.

By Kathy Voth. On Pasture, Nov. 9, 2015

If you go to enough workshops about grazing, you’re bound to see an illustration that shows how biting off the tops of plants impacts their roots, and how if you graze short enough the plants won’t have enough roots to rebound and produce more leafy material.

Read the rest of this article in On Pasture.

If you go to enough workshops about grazing, you’re bound to see an illustration that shows how biting off the tops of plants impacts their roots, and how if you graze short enough, the plant won’t have enough roots to rebound and produce more leafy material. In fact, if you’ve been with us at On Pasture for any length of time, you’ll have seen a version of that illustration. It looks like this: – See more at: http://onpasture.com/2015/11/09/great-grass-farmers-grow-roots/#!prettyPhoto
short roots can’t hold the soil in place, let alone do their job of feeding soil microorganisms, creating a sponge to hold water, and pulling carbon from the air deep, deep into the soil where it can be sequestered. – See more at: http://onpasture.com/2015/11/09/great-grass-farmers-grow-roots/#sthash.jQYZ3qFB.dpuf
short roots can’t hold the soil in place, let alone do their job of feeding soil microorganisms, creating a sponge to hold water, and pulling carbon from the air deep, deep into the soil where it can be sequestered. – See more at: http://onpasture.com/2015/11/09/great-grass-farmers-grow-roots/#sthash.jQYZ3qFB.dpuf

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