A Siege of Herons and a Skewer of Egrets

Highrise Homes for Young Families, Easy Access to Fish

May 22, 2016

The normally silent, spreading crowns of the live oaks along North and South Boulevards in Houston have been turned into noisy rookeries these past few weeks as yellow-crowned night herons and great egrets moved in to build nests and start families. The same densely-populated housing developments have no doubt been built all over the city in shady trees with relatively close access to nearby bayous and creeks for food. In this case, the parents appear to be bringing home fish and other edibles from Brays Bayou.

The noisy bird activity (squawks and kraks and lots of fluttering) has also drawn out bird watchers and photographers, including Allison Zapata, who’s been posting her photos on her website and on Twitter. She took the following photo of a juvenile yellow-crowned night heron and sent it to us.

Houston is on the Central Flyway for migrating birds. Yellow-crowned night herons and great egrets reside in the Houston area year-round. But Allison, who’s been watching these birds, said they were are on their way to somewhere and would be back again in the fall.

Juvenile yellow-crowned night heron pondering whether to fly or stay in the nest as long as possible. Photo on May 20, 2016, by Allison Zapata.

Juvenile yellow-crowned night heron pondering whether to fly or stay in the nest as long as possible. Photo on May 20, 2016, by Allison Zapata.

 

 

4 thoughts on “A Siege of Herons and a Skewer of Egrets”

  1. Jim Olive says:

    Glad to see other photographers out there documenting the environment and sharing with SBB. Heron seems to be having a bad feather day. Jim

    1. Yes! Calling for more photographers of our remaining natural environment!

  2. Daphne Scarbrough says:

    Definitely a bad feather day, but I am not sure from the look of the eyes, that our feathered friend is concerned. Wonderful photo, reminds me of a Jim Olive photo!

    Photos matter, no one would believe what wildlife lives in our City otherwise.

    1. Check out Allison’s video of great egret chicks fighting for food in their nest in the same neighborhood. It’s on our Facebook page.

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